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Bubbles and Bangs - How gases get out of magma and what happens when they don't

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Iconic examples of volcanic eruptions include Hawaiian fire fountains and large billowing eruption columns. These phenomena are caused by gases (mostly water) that are dissolved within the molten rock (magma) at depth but form bubbles as the magma rises to the Earth’s surface. To understand the processes involved, we will start with something more familiar that you may even have with you the bubbles in carbonated drinks. From there we will talk about how bubbles drive explosive eruptions, what we can learn from the bubbles preserved in volcanic rocks, and the role of bubbles in producing volcanic ash.

This talk is part of the Trinity College Science Society (TCSS) series.

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