University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Behaviour, Ecology & Evolution Seminar Series > Behavioral flexibility is not predicted by innovation or brain size in great-tailed grackles, New Caledonian crows, and Western scrub jays

Behavioral flexibility is not predicted by innovation or brain size in great-tailed grackles, New Caledonian crows, and Western scrub jays

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr Hannah Rowland.

Many cross-species studies attest that innovation frequency (novel food types eaten and foraging techniques used) is a measure of behavioral flexibility and show that it positively correlates with relative brain size (corrected for body size). I investigated behavioral flexibility directly in three bird species that vary in innovation frequency and relative brain size, and found that it does not correlate with either variable. These results challenge long-standing assumptions and question the use of proxies for behavioral flexibility.

This talk is part of the Behaviour, Ecology & Evolution Seminar Series series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity