University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Financial History Seminar > The Market for Bank Stocks and the Rise of Deposit Banking in New York City, 1866-1897

The Market for Bank Stocks and the Rise of Deposit Banking in New York City, 1866-1897

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact D'Maris Coffman.

The rapid growth of deposits in New York City over the three decades following the Civil War is often attributed to the release of pent-up demand for the services that transactions accounts could provide. I advance a complementary explanation that considers the role of an increasingly efficient market for bank shares. The stock market was important because it generated price and dividend quotations that signaled depositors about the soundness of individual banks, thereby directing the expansion. At the same time, innovations within the city’s banks created conditions under which stock prices became more informative, reducing asymmetries between banks and depositors to a point where confidence in banks could grow. Using a new database of stock prices, dividends, and balance sheet items for traded New York City banks from 1866 to 1897, a series of dynamic panel data models show that stock prices did indeed affect the distribution of the growing deposit base.

This talk is part of the Financial History Seminar series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2014 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity