University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Archaeology Graduate Seminar Series > The Adriatic Plain: A Late Glacial Refugium? Preliminary zooarchaeological data from the Late Upper Palaeolithic site of Vela Spila (Croatia)

The Adriatic Plain: A Late Glacial Refugium? Preliminary zooarchaeological data from the Late Upper Palaeolithic site of Vela Spila (Croatia)

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Mark Sapwell.

with drinks and nibbles afterwards in the McDonald Coffee Room

The Late Upper Pleistocene (LUP) was a time of cold climatic conditions in Europe, especially during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) c. 20 – 18,000 BP. As a result, humans would have faced severe survival conditions due to the diminished availability of resources. It is generally assumed that this resulted in an impoverishment of the subsistence base, as well as migrations to more ‘favourable’ areas (i.e. refugia). Zooarchaeological research has the potential to address these issues by looking at the quality, quantity and characteristics of faunal assemblages during the LUP . Was human diet impoverished (i.e. were humans hungry) or were novel modifications introduced? Were humans able to survive throughout Europe or did they move to refugia? If so, what subsistence practices took place at these human-saturated ‘pockets’? Archaeological research is taking place at Vela Spila cave, located on Korula island (Croatia), although part of the Adriatic Plain during the LUP . Given its rich and continuous stratigraphic sequence, beginning in the LGM (19395±366 BP), it offers a unique opportunity for the study of LUP dietary adaptations and assessing SE European refugia. Results up until now show interesting dietary choices, with Cervus elaphus as the ‘dominant’ species throughout the LUP (with values of up to +90% of NISP ), followed by Equus sp. (hydruntinus?) and other smaller-sized species (e.g. Lepus europaeus). The LUP economic importance of red deer will be assessed, and so will the changes in representation of other ‘secondary’ species.

This talk is part of the Archaeology Graduate Seminar Series series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2022 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity