University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Exoplanet Meetings > DISEQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY SIGNATURES WITH JWST, AND TOWARDS THE CONSISTENT MODELLING OF HAZE IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

DISEQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY SIGNATURES WITH JWST, AND TOWARDS THE CONSISTENT MODELLING OF HAZE IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Richard Booth.

When will the James Webb Space Telescope launch? This question will not be answered in this talk, but we take a rough first look at narrowing the parameter space in terms of chemical observation with the James Webb Space Telescope (Blumenthal et al., 2018) We look at 3 planet cases that mimic a range of planetary radius and equilibrium temperature. We link and compare two types of chemistry models from Venot et al. (2012)—thermochemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics with photochemistry —with a 1D radiative transfer model (Cubillos et al., in preparation). We then link this output to the JWST imulator, PandExo (Batalha et al., 2017). We find some observable differences between the two chemical models from 4 to 5 microns due to the abundances of CO, CO2 , and H2O . Thus, we prescribe a ‘sweet spot’ of planetary mass, temperature, and metallicity that would be most fruitful for high-resolution characterization with JWST . As Blumenthal et al. (2018) used a forward modeling approach with the chemistry of Venot et al., (2012), we begin to explore the application of different chemical schemes in a 1D self-consistent radiative-convective and chemistry atmospheric code, ATMO (Tremblin et al., 2015). We implement a larger hydrocarbon chemical network (Venot et al., 2015) into ATMO , with the goal of modeling haze precursors and their feedback on the structure of the atmosphere. I will present the benchmark of this work and additionally, some preliminary work on implementation of a sulfur chemical network (Zahnle et al., 2016) into ATMO .

This talk is part of the Exoplanet Meetings series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity