University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars > Greedy genes: the role of appetite in genetic susceptibility to obesity

Greedy genes: the role of appetite in genetic susceptibility to obesity

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There is considerable variation in early weight gain, despite the ubiquity of the ‘obesogenic’ food environment; some children gain excessive weight, while others do not. Genetic susceptibility to the environment is thought to explain some of the variation in early weight gain, with differences in appetite being implicated as the mediating mechanism, so-called ‘Behavioural Susceptibility Theory’ (BST). BST hypothesises that children who inherit a more avid appetite, and lower sensitivity to satiety, are more likely to overeat in response to the modern food environment and to gain excessive weight. This talk summarises the role of appetite in early weight gain and eating behaviour, using data from Gemini – the largest twin birth cohort ever set up to study genetic and environmental influences on early growth.

This talk is part of the MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars series.

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