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Populism: What led to the rise of the New Right?

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Join us for an expert discussion on the connection between populism and the new Far Right in modern-day Europe, focusing especially on Belgium, Austria, Germany, Hungary, Italy and Poland. This event is jointly organized by the CU Belgian Society, the CU European Society, the CU German Society, the CU Italian Society and the CU Polish Society.

Benjamin De Cleen is an assistant professor at the VUB Communication Studies Department (Brussels) where he is the coordinator of the English-language Communication Studies master on Journalism and Media in Europe. His research is situated within discourse studies, and has mainly been focused on radical right rhetoric, and on the discourse-theoretical development of the concepts of populism, nationalism and conservatism.

Prof. Paul Richard Corner was educated at Cambridge and then Oxford, and is now based in the Dipartimento di Scienze sociali, politiche e cognitive at the University of Siena in Italy. He specializes in Italian fascism and totalitarianism. He will contribute a then-and-now approach with reference to populism and right-wing extremism in Italy.

Dr Oliver Gruber (Departments of Political Science, University of Vienna, University of Innsbruck) will explore current developments in right-wing political extremism and right-wing populism in Austria and Germany. His expertise is predominantly on the party political dimension of right wing politics (i.e. radical right populist parties), and draws on comparative experiences from both Austria (his home country) and Germany.

Dr Harald Wydra (based in the POLIS Department at Cambridge) is specialized in the politics of memory, national consciousness, identity and nationalism. He will focus on Eastern Europe, especially Poland and Hungary, as well as former East Germany.

After a discussion moderated by the European Society, the floor will be opened to questions from the audience.

This is the first of a series of panel discussions on the rise of political extremism in Europe. A number of European societies are coordinating a further event in Lent Term, which will cover other parts of Europe as well.

This talk is part of the Populism and Political Extremism series.

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