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St Catharine's Political Economy Seminar Series - Speaker: David Miles

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Philippa Millerchip.

Talk Title: “Real Estate and the Financial Sector in the Short and Long Term”

The next St Catharine’s Political Economy Seminar in the series on the Economics of Austerity, will be held on Wednesday 2 November 2016 – David Miles will give a talk on “Real Estate and the Financial Sector in the Short and Long Term”. The seminar will be held in the Ramsden Room at St Catharine’s College from 6.00-7.30 pm. All are welcome. The seminar series is supported by the Cambridge Journal of Economics and the Economics and Policy Group at the Cambridge Judge Business School.

Speaker: David Miles is Professor of Financial Economics at Imperial College, London. He was a member of the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England between May 2009 and September 2010. As an economist he has focused on the interaction between financial markets and the wider economy. He was Chief UK Economist at Morgan Stanley from October 2004 to May 2009. In 2004 he led a government review of the UK mortgage market. He is currently undertaking a review for the UK Treasury on reference prices of UK government bonds. He is a research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research and at the CESIFO research institute in Munich. He is Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Institute for Fiscal Studies. He was awarded a CBE in December 2015.

Talk Overview: David Miles will talk on why house prices in the UK are so high. Can prices and mortgage debt continue to rise? Is the variability of commercial property prices linked to variations in the availability of bank finance? David Miles will explore these issues and consider how the property landscape in the UK might play out over the longer term.

Please contact the seminar organisers Philip Arestis (pa267@cam.ac.uk) and Michael Kitson (m.kitson@jbs.cam.ac.uk) in the event of a query.

This talk is part of the St Catharine's Political Economy Seminar Series series.

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