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Exploring the controls on earthquakes and tectonics; from the plains of India to the greatest mountain range on Earth

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The India-Asia collision zone is a classic example of a continental collision. In this talk I will describe a variety of studies, using a wide range of techniques, that my colleagues and I have used to gain a greater understanding of this region (and continental tectonics in general). I will describe the results of earthquakes studies and fieldwork in peninsular India, seismological results from the Tibetan Plateau, and numerical modelling of deformation and temperatures. By combining the results of these disparate methods into a coherent overall view of the tectonics of Asia, I will discuss the progress we have been able to make in understanding what controls the characteristics of earthquakes and the evolution and deformation of mountain ranges.

Biography: Undergrad in Earth Sciences in Oxford (2000-2004), PhD in Cambridge (2004-2008, with Jackson and McKenzie), postdoc in Caltech (2008-2010), Research Fellowship (2010-2012) and then Lectureship (2012 – ) in Cambridge.

This talk is part of the Sedgwick Club talks series.

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