University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Cambridgeshire Area) > Sensors in Agriculture: past, present and future

Sensors in Agriculture: past, present and future

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Publicity Officer, IMechE Beds & Cambs area.

This presentation will briefly review the development of some commercial sensor systems and what farmers are using now: from auto-steer tractors to real-time nitrogen sensing; from robotic milkers to grain stores and even touch on sensor uses in slaughterhouses. There will be a discussion of some of the sensors being developed now how agricultural applications could still benefit from improved and innovative sensor systems.

EurIng Dave Tinker MIMechE FIAgrE is a mechanical and agricultural engineer. David started his career with a tractor manufacturer, then worked on appropriate technologies for agriculture and rural industries overseas before moving into applied research especially on tractors, meat safety and animal welfare at Silsoe Research Institute. He now runs the European Society of Agricultural Engineers (www.eurageng.eu), with its successful AgEng conferences, and has his own R&D consultancy.

Time: Refreshments served from 18.30. Talk starts at 19.00. Ends around 20.30 following questions and discussion.

Venue: Lecture Room 4, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (directions at www.eng.cam.ac.uk/visitors/). There is limited parking available on site.

Free to attend. Registration not required. All welcome.

This talk is open to the public and is suitable for students and engineers. You are encouraged to bring with you colleagues, friends and family who are interested in engineering and agriculture.

This talk is part of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Cambridgeshire Area) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity