University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Brain Mapping Unit Networks Meeting and the Cambridge Connectome Consortium > The brain at 'rest': investigating spontaneous activity in BOLD fMRI using Independent Component Analysis

The brain at 'rest': investigating spontaneous activity in BOLD fMRI using Independent Component Analysis

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Mikail Rubinov.

Functional connectivity, particularly as measured during the resting-state in BOLD fMRI has become a popular approach for assessing interactivity in the brain. The study of patterns of connectivity between multiple distributed regions and their associated functional dynamics has been recognised as a powerful tool in cognitive and clinical imaging neurosciences. Different approaches such as seed-based analysis and Independent Component Analysis have been used extensively to characterise the spatial patterns of resting activity, though there exists an array of methodological and interpretative issues that remain to be resolved. In this talk we will review the approaches most commonly employed and discuss the similarities and differences across various different techniques. We will provide examples of their utility and discuss possible modes of failure.

This talk is part of the Brain Mapping Unit Networks Meeting and the Cambridge Connectome Consortium series.

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