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Urban Microclimate Studies - Numerical and Experimental

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Abstract: This presentation introduces a research project involving numerical and experimental studies carried out at the University of Reading, UK, which is funded by the UK Engineering Physical and Science Research Council (EPSRC). This includes 1) the introduction of a simplified urban microclimate simulation model (UMCsim); 2) Experiment campaigns at Reading and London urban blocks; and 3) the testing of a simulation model. The simplified urban microclimate simulation tool can be used as a first-cut calculation by urban planners and architects in the context of sustainable urban design at the strategic design stage. The numerical method can be further used to identify urban heat island phenomenon.

Biography: Dr Runming Yao is a Reader in Sustainable Built Environments at the School of Construction Management and engineering (SCME), an Associate of Walker Institution for Climate Change System Research, the University of Reading and a visiting professor of Chongqing University, China. She heads the group of Urban and Building Sustainability at the SCME . She has over twenty years experience in building energy modelling, built environment microclimates simulation, energy efficiency design, management and assessment, and indoor environment quality assessment. She has published over 80 papers and 4 books in the field of sustainable built environment internationally.

This talk is part of the Martin Centre Research Seminar Series - 41st Annual Series of Lunchtime Lectures series.

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