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Paper: Polymorphic Cis- and Trans-Regulation of Human Gene Expression

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Cheung VG, Nayak RR, Wang IX, Elwyn S, Cousins SM, et al. (2010) Polymorphic Cis- and Trans-Regulation of Human Gene Expression. PLoS Biol 8(9): e1000480. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000480

Abstract 

Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq) and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated) genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

Author Summary

Cellular characteristics and functions are determined largely by gene expression and expression levels differ among individuals, however it is not clear how these levels are regulated. While many cis-acting DNA sequence variants in promoters and enhancers that influence gene expression have been identified, only a few polymorphic trans-regulators of human genes are known. Here, we used human B-cells from individuals belonging to large families and identified polymorphic trans-regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated these results by gene knockdown, metabolic perturbation studies and chromosome conformation capture assays. Although these regulatory relationships were identified in cultured B-cells, we show that some of the relationships were also found in primary fibroblasts. The large number of regulators allowed us to better understand gene expression regulation, to uncover new gene functions, and to identify their roles in disease processes. This study shows that genetic variation is a powerful tool not only for gene mapping but also to study gene interaction and regulation.

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This talk is part of the CRI Reading Group on Cancer Systems Biology series.

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