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Can 'Good' be Bad and 'Bad' be Good? (On Line)

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We may be going in a certain direction in our lives, and it may appear to be right but if our ideas of the destination itself changes and we understand more factors to consider, then what was right before becomes the wrong direction. With the new destination, what was good earlier may be bad and what was bad becomes the necessary good. When the parameters change, everything changes.

In discussion with Dr Prashant Kakoday and Neville Hodgkinson.

Dr Prashant Kakoday is based in Cambridge and has a background in E.N.T. surgery and integrated health. His main interest is in the relationship between the psyche, emotions, behaviour and health. Prashant has spoken on these subjects in many countries and institutions, including the W.H.O. and the Medical Teaching Program within the U.S.A.

Neville Hodgekinson A Medical and Science correspondent for the Sunday times in the past and the author of ‘Will To Be Well’, Neville Hodgkinson has authoritative insights on the subject of mind and matter. He has followed the teachings of Brahma Kumaris for many years, and lives in the Global Retreat Centre near Oxford.

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This talk is part of the Inner Space, The Meditation Centre series.

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