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The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn

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Anne Boleyn is one of the most fascinating figures in English history, but arguably also one of the most misunderstood. In her lecture, Alison Weir will focus on her latest writing project, The Lady in the Tower, set for publication this autumn. The talk will be concerned primarily with Anne’s last months, her imprisonment in the Tower, her trial, and eventual downfall. The lecture will consider how Thomas Cromwell, Henry’s chief minister, crafted Boleyn’s fate, and the political intrigues that surrounded it. The book will be a valuable contribution to the wealth of literature already available on Anne Boleyn, from such authors as Eric Ives and Joanna Denny, and we hope very much that you will be able to join us for what looks set to be a superb evening.

Bio: Alison Weir is one of Britain’s best-loved and most prolific historians. She is the author of ten books, including The Princes in the Tower (1992), Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII (1996) and Eleanor of Aquitaine: By the Wrath of God, Queen of England (1999). Her most recent publication is a biography of Katherine Swynford, third wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. She has also penned historical novels. Before becoming a historian, Alison Weir taught, and presently lives in Surrey.

The Ivory Tower Society, which has played host to such luminaries as Sir Richard Dearlove, Professor Stephen Hawking and Sir Christopher Zeeman, is honoured to host one of our foremost historical scholars.

This talk is part of the Pembroke Papers, Pembroke College series.

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