University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Pitt-Rivers Archaeological Science Seminar Series > Early food production and human-animal relations: Isotopic insights into Neolithic social reconfiguration in the Near East

Early food production and human-animal relations: Isotopic insights into Neolithic social reconfiguration in the Near East

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  • UserProf. Cheryl Makarewicz (University of Kiel)
  • ClockFriday 13 November 2020, 13:15-14:00
  • HouseOnline via zoom.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Alette Blom.

https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwlceusqzooH905h9NRiWPbSPG8PFLv3a--

First human experimentation with plant cultivation 12,000 years ago took place within the context of community-oriented forms of social organization that were constructed and reified by the built environment and mortuary performance. The later incorporation of domesticated livestock into Pre-Pottery Neolithic subsistence systems further increased the reliability and predictability of food available for human consumption, but also disrupted community cohesion and stimulated a break from ‘hearth and home’ . Drawing from the stable isotopic record, I discuss how shifting scales of mobility and daily practice encouraged this profound social transformation while also critically addressing the challenges in establishing human and animal movement in geologically complex, semi-arid regions such as the southern Levant.

This talk is part of the Pitt-Rivers Archaeological Science Seminar Series series.

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