University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars > Health as an asset: estimating the causal effects of health conditions and health behaviours on social and economic outcomes using Mendelian randomization

Health as an asset: estimating the causal effects of health conditions and health behaviours on social and economic outcomes using Mendelian randomization

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  • UserDr Laura Howe, MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol World_link
  • ClockTuesday 15 September 2020, 11:00-12:00
  • HouseOnline.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Paul Browne.

This seminar will be broadcast live online, please register in advance for this meeting: https://mrc-epid.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJckcu6vqTwoHdNAY3h7JqDyxMYglX6JTQuT

A vast body of literature describes the social determinants of health, identifying stark inequalities in many health conditions and health related behaviours. But relationships between health and social factors (such as socioeconomic position, social contact, and wellbeing) are potentially bidirectional; poor health may limit a person’s ability to achieve their full potential in education, employment or in their social life. Studying the social and socioeconomic consequences of health is fraught with difficulties due to the strong potential for confounding and reverse causation. In this talk, I will describe the use of Mendelian randomization to enhance causal inference in this topic, describing findings from UK Biobank and ALSPAC .

This seminar will be broadcast live online, please register in advance for this meeting:

https://mrc-epid.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJckcu6vqTwoHdNAY3h7JqDyxMYglX6JTQuT

This talk is part of the MRC Epidemiology and CEDAR Seminars series.

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