University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Kelvin Club - The Scientific Society of Peterhouse, Cambridge > Turning cells inside out: how epithelial cells polarise and why this goes wrong in cancer

Turning cells inside out: how epithelial cells polarise and why this goes wrong in cancer

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  • UserProfessor Daniel St Johnston, The Gurdon Institute, Department of Cambridge
  • ClockTuesday 19 November 2019, 20:30-21:30
  • HousePeterhouse Theatre.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Mr Simon Thomas.

Most of our tissue and organs are composed of cells that adhere to each other to form epithelial sheets and tubes that act as a barriers between our insides and the outside world. In order to form these sheets, all of the cells must first polarise in the same direction, with their apical surfaces facing outside, and a loss of this polarity is a hallmark of cancer. I will discuss how we think that epithelial cells polarise and why we don’t understand as much as we thought.

This talk is part of the Kelvin Club - The Scientific Society of Peterhouse, Cambridge series.

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