University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Slavonic Studies > Poland, Freedom, Europe: A Personal Reflection On the Last 40 Years

Poland, Freedom, Europe: A Personal Reflection On the Last 40 Years

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In celebration of the permanent endowment of the Polish Studies initiative at the University of Cambridge, Professor Timothy Garton Ash (University of Oxford) will give an address on the subject of freedom in Poland and in Europe over the last four decades.

After the lecture, we invite all guests to an informal wine reception to celebrate the permanent endowment of Cambridge Polish Studies.

Please sign up for a free ticket via Eventbrite

Timothy Garton Ash is the author of nine books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last thirty years. He is Professor of European Studies in the University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. His essays appear regularly in the New York Review of Books and he writes a column on international affairs in the Guardian which is widely syndicated in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

His books include: ‘Und willst Du nicht mein Bruder sein …’ Die DDR heute (1981), a book published in West Germany about what was then still East Germany; The Polish Revolution: Solidarity (1983), which won the Somerset Maugham Award; The Uses of Adversity: Essays on the Fate of Central Europe (1989), for which he was awarded the Prix Européen de l’Essai; We the People: The Revolution of ’89 witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin and Prague (1990; US Edition: The Magic Lantern), which was translated into fifteen languages; In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent (1993), named Political Book of the Year in Germany; The File: A Personal History (1997), which has so far appeared in sixteen languages; H_istory of the Present: Essays, Sketches and Despatches from Europe in the 1990s_ (2000); Free World (2004); and Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade without a Name (2009). He is currently writing a book about free speech in the age of the internet and mass migration.

This talk is part of the Slavonic Studies series.

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